If This Cathedral Could Talk

Houston historian Mike Vance shares the wild times Christ Church Cathedral has witnessed

Christ Church Cathedral was founded March 16, 1839. Recalling seventh grade Texas history–or any of the many fine books you may have read on the history of our great state–you’ll remember that at this point Texas had only been independent from Mexico since March 2, 1836. Houston became incorporated on June 5, 1837. It would still be a good eight years until we became annexed to the United States on December 29,1845. These were wild and uncertain times to be a Houstonian.

In 1836 the enterprising Allen Brothers hired Gail Borden to map the town. He laid out the streets on a grid. Texas Avenue, the new town’s principal east-west thoroughfare, measured a grand 100 feet across, wide enough to turn a full team of horses around. From the corner of Texas Avenue and Fannin Street, Christ Church Cathedral watched this town grow from a motely group of yellow-fever infested men trying to make something happen on the muddy bayou banks into a major international metropolis.

And thank goodness the Cathedral persevered through its own challenging history to bear witness to it all. This uncivilized mess of a town was in dire need of churching. Bars, brothels and brawls marked Houston’s early days, and even as things settled down somewhat, the city continued to draw and create colorful characters—powerful men and women whose influence is still present and whose names linger on streets and buildings all around us.

Who were they? What were their stories? How do they relate to the Cathedral on Texas Avenue?

Sunday evening, September 22 at 6:30 p.m., Houston historian and author Mike Vance brings all this history to life as he shares stories and images from his new book Mud & Money: a timeline of Houston History. He’ll focus on what was going on in town in the early twentieth century: What was it like in the days when Houston had established itself as a dynamic city with Jesse Jones at the helm? When air-conditioning was finally making the city liveable? When skyscrapers were sprouting all around the Cathedral?  How had the dream represented in Gail Borden’s muddy map become a reality?

These walls can’t talk, but Mike Vance sure can. And he has many fascinating tales to tell. Join us Sunday evening to learn more about the history of our very unique city and the beautiful Cathedral that still thrives in its heart.

Mike Vance presents Mud & Money: a timeline of Houston History
Mellinger Room in Latham Hall
Christ Church Cathedral
Sunday, September 22
6:30 – 7:30 p.m.

And please join us before the presentation for The Well, a contemplative Celtic Eucharist in the Cathedral at 5 p.m., and for tea and toast in Latham Hall at 5:45 p.m!

 

The more you know of your history, the more liberated you are.
~Maya Angelou

 

 

 

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